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Ask the Expert: How Do I Restore My Mom’s Veil?

Posted by Caitlin on Dec 09, 2013

Sponsored Post by: Association of Wedding Gown Specialists

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I really want to wear my mother’s veil to my own wedding, but it’s looking a bit old and stained. Is there a way it can be restored so that it will look clean for my wedding day?

Sally Conant of the Association of Wedding Gown Specialists says: If your mother’s or your grandmother’s wedding gown is just not for you, you can still honor a family member by wearing her vintage bridal veil. Even if the lace-trimmed veil worn by your mother or the Brussels lace veil worn by your grandmother is yellowed and stained, a vintage bridal veil can look like new after bridal veil restoration.

First, it’s important to talk to an expert to find out what the fabrication of the veil is – different materials require different procedures for cleaning and restoration. Worried that the veil is too old? Members of the Association of Wedding Gown Specialists have completed bridal veil restorations on veils made as long ago as 1835.

Many vintage veils are made from variations of Brussels lace such as Point de Gaze, Duchesse, and Princesse as well as combinations of the designs that give these laces their names.  All are cotton and can be restored.  However, the silk in Blonde lace makes it fragile, and Blonde lace veils may need to be lined with tulle.

Occasionally the tulle or net center panel of bridal veils from the 1920s and 1930s is too damaged to use, but the lace border can be restored and appliquéd onto a new center panel made from a sturdy nylon or polyester net.

Silk illusion, popular in the 1950s and 1960s, is simply too fragile to restore, and it is probably best to copy the original bridal veil in a modern tulle or net.

Luckily as early as the 1960s, designers began making bridal veils from synthetics such as nylon or polyester, and such veils, often trimmed with cotton lace, restore beautifully.  Oddly, the cotton lace used to trim a vintage veil will often be more discolored than both silk and synthetic tulle or net, but when restored, the entire veil returns to a uniform color.

Although not every vintage bridal veil can be restored, an expert can tell by looking whether the project will be successful. Bring your vintage wedding accessories to a member of the Association of Wedding Gown Specialists or send an e-mail about your project to us at info@weddinggownspecialists.com.

 

 

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